Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Todays Date: 11/17/19
Last Update: 11/07/19 09:37:39 PM

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Works & Process at the Guggenheim
presents
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Season Preview
Featuring Resident Choreographer Jamar Roberts
Monday, November 18, 2019 at 7:30pm

Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, presents Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Season Preview featuring Resident Choreographer Jamar Roberts on Monday, November 18 at 7:30pm.
 
Preview Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's December season at New York City Center, which includes the world premiere of Ode by Jamar Roberts, Ailey's first resident choreographer. This new work reflects on the beauty and fragility of life in a time of growing gun violence, set to jazz pianist Don Pullen's tribute to Malcolm X, Suite (Sweet) Malcolm. Ailey's acclaimed dancers perform highlights and Artistic Director Robert Battle will participate in a discussion with Roberts, Donald Byrd and Stefanie Batten Bland, moderated by Marina Harss.
 
TICKETS & VENUE
$45, $40 Guggenheim Members and Friends of Works & Process
House seats may be available for $1,000+ Friends of Works & Process. On a limited basis, house seats may be released to the public before performances at ticket prices of $90, $80 members.
Box Office (212) 423-3575 or worksandprocess.org
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
 
Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by The Christian Humann Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.
 
Robert Battle became artistic director of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in July 2011 after being personally selected by Judith Jamison, making him only the third person to head the Company since it was founded in 1958. A frequent choreographer and artist in residence at Ailey since 1999, he has set many of his works on Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Ailey II, and at The Ailey School. The Company's current repertory includes his ballets
Ella, In/Side, and Mass,. In addition to expanding the Ailey repertory with works by artists as diverse as Kyle Abraham, Mauro Bigonzetti, Rennie Harris, and Paul Taylor, Mr. Battle has also instituted the New Directions Choreography Lab to help develop the next generation of choreographers. Mr. Battle's journey to the top of the modern dance world began in the Liberty City neighborhood of Miami, Florida, studying dance at a high school arts magnet program before moving on to Miami's New World School of the Arts, and finally to the dance program at The Juilliard School. He danced with The Parsons Dance Company from 1994 to 2001, before founding his own Battleworks Dance Company, which debuted performed extensively nationally and internationally. Mr. Battle was honored as one of the "Masters of African-American Choreography" by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 2005, received the prestigious Statue Award from the Princess Grace Foundation-USA in 2007. and was named a 2015 Visiting Fellow for The Art of Change, an initiative by the Ford Foundation.
 
Miami native Jamar Roberts graduated from the New World School of the Arts after beginning his studies at the Dance Empire of Miami, where he continues to teach and mentor students each year. He received a fellowship to The Ailey School before becoming a member of Ailey II, Complexions Contemporary Ballet and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in 2002. Mr. Roberts starred in Moonlight x Ailey, a short dance film (choreographed by Artistic Director Robert Battle) that pays homage to the Oscar-winning film Moonlight. Dance Magazine featured Mr. Roberts as one of "25 to Watch" in 2007 and on the cover in 2013. He performed at The White House in 2010, and as a guest star on So You Think You Can Dance, Dancing with the Stars, and The Ellen DeGeneres Show. In 2015 Mr. Roberts won Outstanding Performer at the prestigious New York Dance and Performance "Bessie" Awards and was a guest star with London's Royal Ballet. Prior to being appointed as Ailey's first-ever Resident Choreographer, he made his Ailey II choreographic debut with Gêmeos (2015), and his Ailey Company debut with Members Don't Get Weary (2017). In addition, Mr. Roberts has an upcoming commission for New York City Ballet's 2020 spring season.
 
Donald Byrd, a TONY nominee (The Color Purple), Bessie Award-winner (The Minstrel Show) and a 2019 Doris Duke Artist Award recipient, is a masterful choreographer often referred to as a "citizen artist" for his ability to craft works that stimulate dialogue through powerful, timely stories and moving social commentary. Byrd has created more than 100 dance works for many companies, including: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Philadelphia Dance Company (Philadanco), Pacific Northwest Ballet, Joffrey Ballet and Donald Byrd/The Group, where he was artistic director from 1978 to 2002. An artistic director of Spectrum Dance Theater since 2002, he recently created works that focus on racial terrorism during the Jim Crow era (lynching), police shootings of un-armed black people, and slavery in its contemporary manifestation (human trafficking). Other productions that showcase his ability to navigate complex societal issues through dance include Interrupted Narratives/War, which tells stories from the war in Iraq, The Theater of Needless Talents, which focuses on the artist victims of the Holocaust, and a cycle of three evening-length works that sought to inspire thoughtful discourse around a post-9/11, globalized America. Byrd has been a cultural envoy for the U.S. Department of State and a fellow at the Institute on the Arts and Civic Dialogue based at Harvard and received. many awards, including a Masters of Choreography Award from The Kennedy Center; a United States Artists Fellowship; and the Mayor's Arts Award for his sustained contributions to the city of Seattle.
 
A Jerome Robbins awardee, Stefanie Batten Bland's interdisciplinary practice interrogates contemporary and historical culture and situates the work at the intersection of installation and dance-theatre. Based in New York City, she founded Company SBB in France in 2008 when she was head choreographer at Paris Opera Comique. In permanent residence at University Settlement, the Company is regularly produced by La MaMa Experimental Theater, which co-presented her new work "Look Who's Coming to Dinner" for FIAF's 2019 Crossing the Line Festival. She has been commissioned by Ailey II, Spoleto Italy, Baryshnikov Arts Center, Singapore Frontier Danceland, Brooklyn Museum and others globally. She also makes dance cinema films that have been shown internationally and creates for fashion and lifestyle partners including Louis Vuitton, VanCleef & Arpels and Hermes. Known for her unique movement aesthetic, she served as movement director for "Eve's Song" at the Public Theater. An inaugural Women's Movement Initiative Choreographer for ABT, she recently set work on Gibney Dance Company and choreographed for Juilliard New Dances. A 2019 fellow for New York University's Center for the Ballet Arts, Stefanie has been featured in global media including New York Times, Marie Claire, TV 5 Monde and Dance Teacher Magazine. She received her MFA in interdisciplinary arts from Goddard College and lives in SoHo with her family, where she grew up as the daughter of creatives.   www.companysbb.org
 
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, New York City Center's Principal Dance Company, returns to the theater's stage December 4th through January 5th for "Ailey Revealed," presenting over two dozen diverse works, including world premieres that shine a spotlight on society - Ailey dancer and first-ever Resident Choreographer Jamar Roberts' Ode offers a meditation on the beauty and fragility of life in a time of growing gun violence and choreographer Donald Byrd will use the 1921 Tulsa riots as a source of inspiration for Greenwood. The five-week holiday season also features company premieres by Aszure Barton and Camille A. Brown, and new productions by Judith Jamison and Lar Lubovitch. For info, visit: www.alvinailey.org
 
Works & Process at the Guggenheim 
Described by The New York Times as "an exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process," for 35 years, New Yorkers have been able to see, hear, and meet the most acclaimed artists in the world, in an intimate setting unlike any other. Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to generations of leading creators and performers. Most performances take place in the Guggenheim's intimate Frank Lloyd Wright-designed 273-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. In 2017, Works & Process established a new residency and commissioning program, inviting artists to create new works, made in and for the iconic Guggenheim rotunda. worksandprocess.org.

Works & Process at the Guggenheim
presents
Brian Brooks Moving Company:
Immersive Technology
Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 7:30pm

Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, presents Brian Brooks Moving Company: Immersive Technology, on Sunday, November 17 at 7:30pm.
 
Brian Brooks, choreographer and Mellon Creative Research Fellow at the University of Washington's Meany Center for the Performing Arts, and Michelle Witt, Executive and Artistic Director of the Meany Center, participate in a discussion moderated by Jacob's Pillow Director Pamela Tatge, prior to the performances' premieres in 2020. See highlights from Brooks' fellowship, where he explores dance in intimate physical and digital spaces and collaborated with Seattle-based physicists and virtual reality programmers.
 
TICKETS & VENUE
$45, $40 Guggenheim Members and Friends of Works & Process
Box Office (212) 423-3575 or worksandprocess.org
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
 
Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by The Christian Humann Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.
 
Brian Brooks is the inaugural Choreographer in Residence at Chicago's Harris Theater for Music and Dance. This innovative three-year fellowship supports several commissions for Brooks, including new works for Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, Miami City Ballet, and his own New York-based group. A 2013 Guggenheim Fellow, other recent awards include a NY City Center Fellowship, Joyce Theater Artist Residency and Mellon Foundation Creative Artist Fellowship. Brooks' work has toured internationally since 2002 with presentations by BAM's Next Wave Festival, the Joyce Theater, Jacob's Pillow, the American Dance Festival, NY City Center Fall for Dance Festival, and the Works and Process series at the Guggenheim Museum, among others. Lumberyard Performing Arts (formerly American Dance Institute) has provided ongoing support through commissioned premieres and Incubator Production Residencies. Beyond his company, Brooks has developed work with renowned ballet dancers, actors, and student groups. Damian Woetzel/Vail International Dance Festival has commissioned him to create three works featuring dancers from NYC Ballet and Pacific Northwest Ballet, including First Fall, in which he dances with former NY City Ballet Principal Wendy Whelan. He is in his fifth year collaborating and touring with Whelan, currently performing a duet evening accompanied by the string quartet Brooklyn Rider. Brooks has choreographed off-Broadway Shakespeare productions for Theatre for a New Audience including A Midsummer Night's Dream (2013), directed by Julie Taymor, and Pericles (2016), directed by Trevor Nunn. He has created dances for Eliot Feld's Ballet Tech, The Juilliard School, Boston Conservatory, The School at Jacob's Pillow, Harvard University, and many others. Brooks dedicated 12 years as a Teaching Artist at Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education and has been on part-time faculty at Rutgers University and Princeton University. He learned how to run up walls and fly off a trampoline while performing for three years with daredevil choreographer Elizabeth Streb.
 
Works & Process at the Guggenheim 
Described by The New York Times as "an exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process," for 35 years, New Yorkers have been able to see, hear, and meet the most acclaimed artists in the world, in an intimate setting unlike any other. Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to generations of leading creators and performers. Most performances take place in the Guggenheim's intimate Frank Lloyd Wright-designed 273-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. In 2017, Works & Process established a new residency and commissioning program, inviting artists to create new works, made in and for the iconic Guggenheim rotunda. worksandprocess.org.

Works & Process at the Guggenheim
presents
Merce Cunningham Centennial Celebration
November 24- 25, 2019 at 7:30pm

Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, presents the Merce Cunningham Centennial Celebration on Sunday, November 24 and Monday, November 15 at 7:30pm.
 
Dylan Crossman, a former member of Merce Cunningham Dance Company, curates a program celebrating the 100th birthday of modern dance legend Merce Cunningham. The program opens with Cunningham Centennial Solos: Works & Process at the Guggenheim, a unique arrangement of solos drawn from the recent Merce Cunningham Trust production Night of 100 Solos: A Centennial Event. The arrangement - made especially for the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed theater at the Guggenheim, by Dylan Crossman with Andrea Weber and performed by members of the Los Angeles and New York casts of Night of 100 Solos - is set to music by John King and features costumes by Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung. Next, Crossman and fellow former company member Jamie Scott perform duets spanning several decades of Cunningham's work, with live music by Jesse Stiles and Pauline H. Kim. Weber moderates a discussion with former Cunningham dancers Kimberly Bartosik; Gus Solomons, Jr.; Dylan Crossman; and Jamie Scott.
 
TICKETS & VENUE
$45, $40 Guggenheim Members and Friends of Works & Process
House seats may be available for $1,000+ Friends of Works & Process. On a limited basis, house seats may be released to the public before performances at ticket prices of $90, $80 members.
Box Office (212) 423-3575 or worksandprocess.org
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
 
This program is presented courtesy of the Merce Cunningham Trust as part of the Cunningham Centennial celebrations. Choreography by Merce Cunningham © Merce Cunningham Trust. All rights reserved.
 
Lead funding for Works & Process is provided by The Christian Humann Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.
 
Works & Process at the Guggenheim 
Described by The New York Times as "an exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process," for 35 years, New Yorkers have been able to see, hear, and meet the most acclaimed artists in the world, in an intimate setting unlike any other. Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to generations of leading creators and performers. Most performances take place in the Guggenheim's intimate Frank Lloyd Wright-designed 273-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. In 2017, Works & Process established a new residency and commissioning program, inviting artists to create new works, made in and for the iconic Guggenheim rotunda. worksandprocess.org.

Works & Process at the Guggenheim
presents
Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi
December 7-15, 2019
 
"Book fast. This is a popular show."
- The New Yorker
 
"A new holiday tradition"
- The New York Times
 
"Isaac Mizrahi...(is) a natural storyteller with musical instincts and vivacious wit." - The New York Times
 
Video Preview - https://youtu.be/lwluEO88wxU

Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, presents Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi from December 7-15, 2019, with performances Saturday, December 7 and 14 at 1pm, 2:30pm and 4pm; Sunday, December 8 and 15 at 2:30pm and 4pm; Friday, December 13 at 6:30pm
 
Isaac Mizrahi narrates and directs Sergei Prokofiev's charming children's classic. Ensemble Signal (conducted by Oliver Hagen from 12/7-8 and Brad Lubman from 12/13-15) performs the music, and the cast, wearing costumes by Mizrahi, performs choreography by John Heginbotham, bringing the 30-minute story to life for the young and young at heart.
 
In conjunction with the Sunday, December 8, 2:30pm performance and in partnership with the Guggenheim's education department and Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing there will be a Children's Book Illustrator Series event. Two-time Caldecott Medal winning illustrator Chris Raschka, will read from his illustrated telling of Peter & The Wolf at 1:30 pm, followed by the performance. Tickets for this special event are $100/$95 member and include a signed copy of Chris Raschka's Peter & the Wolf.
 
No matter how tall or small, everyone needs a ticket. Please enter via the ramp at the corner of 5th Ave & 88th St.
 
ABOUT PETER & THE WOLF
In 1936, Sergei Prokofiev was commissioned to write a light-hearted piece for children that would introduce the instruments and sounds of the orchestra. He was given a libretto, but he didn't like it, so he came up with a new story. The music was completed in a week. Peter & the Wolf was the result, and it is a work still loved by children and adults. The story tells how Peter, against his grandfather's will, opens the park gate, ventures into the big green meadow, and ultimately manages to liberate the City from the scary wolf. Peter captures the wolf with the help of a bird, his friend, and hands him over to the hunter, with a specific request: to take the wolf to the zoo. The narrator reads the story between the musical sections and each character in the story is represented by an instrument: Peter - strings; Grandfather - bassoon; Duck - oboe; Hunter - timpani; Bird - flute; Cat - clarinet; and Wolf - french horn.
 
Cast: Derrick Arthur, Kristen Foote, Marjorie Folkman, Mayfield Haynes, Daniel Pettrow, Macy Sullivan, Gus Solomons
 
TICKETS & VENUE
$45, $40 Guggenheim Members and Friends of Works & Process (unless otherwise noted)
House seats may be available for $1,000+ Friends of Works & Process. On a limited basis, house seats may be released to the public before performances at ticket prices of $90, $80 members.
Premium Front Row Ticketing: $100, $95 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members.
Box Office (212) 423-3575 or worksandprocess.org
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
 
No matter how tall or small, everyone needs a ticket. 
 
Please enter via the ramp at the corner of 5th Ave & 88th St.
 
Isaac Mizrahi (libra) has directed numerous theatrical productions and operas including a 2014 production of The Magic Flute at Opera Theatre of Saint Louis. Mizrahi has worked extensively in the theater both as a performer and a designer of sets and costumes. He was the subject and co-creator of Unzipped, a documentary following the making of his Fall 1994 ready-to-wear collection which received an award at the Sundance Film Festival. He has been a leader in the fashion industry for nearly 30 years and currently serves as the Chief Designer for the IMNYC Isaac Mizrahi and Isaac Mizrahi Live! collections. He hosted his own television talk show for five years, has written three books and has made countless appearances in movies and television. Mizrahi has his own production company, Isaac Mizrahi Entertainment, under which he has several projects in development in television, theatre and literature. His New York Times bestselling memoir, I.M., was published in February 2019. He performs cabaret across the country and will be appearing at Café Carlyle January 21-February 8, 2020. 
 
Originally from Anchorage, Alaska, John Heginbotham (choreography) graduated from The Juilliard School in 1993, and was a member of Mark Morris Dance Group (1998-2012). In 2011, he founded Dance Heginbotham, which has been presented and commissioned by Baryshnikov Arts Center, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Duke Performances, Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, The Kennedy Center, The Joyce Theater, Lincoln Center, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, among others. John received a 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship and in June 2014, he was awarded the Jacob's Pillow Dance Award. John is currently a Research Fellow at the National Center for Choreography at The University of Akron (NCCAkron), was awarded a 2017/18 New York City Center Choreography Fellowship, was a 2016 Fellow at NYU's Center for Ballet and the Arts, and is a two-time recipient of the Jerome Robbins Foundation New Essential Works (NEW) Fellowship (2010, 2012). Sought-after as a freelance choreographer, John's current projects include a new commission for The Washington Ballet, 2019; the Tony Award-winning Oklahoma!, directed by Daniel Fish(premiere at Bard Summerscape, 2015; St. Ann's Warehouse, 2018; Broadway, 2019); and John Adams' Girls of the Golden West, directed by Peter Sellars (San Francisco Opera, 2017; Dutch National Opera, 2019). John is the Director of the Dartmouth Dance Ensemble, and is a founding teacher of Dance for PD®, an ongoing collaboration between the Mark Morris Dance Group and the Brooklyn Parkinson Group.
 
Brad Lubman, conductor/composer is founding Co-Artistic and Music Director of Ensemble Signal. Lubman is one of the foremost conductors of modern music and a leading figure in the field for over two decades. A frequent guest conductor of the world's most distinguished orchestras and new music ensembles, he has gained widespread recognition for his versatility, commanding technique, and insightful interpretations. His flexibility in a variety of settings has led him to conduct a broad range of repertoire from classical to contemporary works, and to direct projects including orchestra, opera, multimedia, and mixed ensemble. Lubman has led major orchestras including the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, The Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, Filarmonica della Scala, NDR Sinfonieorchester Hamburg, Dresden Philharmonic, DSO Berlin, RSO Stuttgart, WDR Symphony Cologne, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Finnish Radio Symphony and the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra. In addition, he has worked with some of the most important ensembles for contemporary music, including London Sinfonietta, Ensemble Modern, Klangforum Wien, musikFabrik and Steve Reich and Musicians. His own music has been performed in the USA and Europe, and can be heard on his CD, Insomniac, on Tzadik. Brad Lubman is on faculty at the Eastman School of Music and the Bang on a Can Summer Institute.
 
Grammy-winning pianist and conductor Oliver Hagen is currently on faculty at Juilliard Pre-College, Special Music School, and School for Strings in New York City. Hagen has performed with Ensemble Signal since its debut in 2008. Since then, he has appeared as a pianist in Signal performances at venues such as Carnegie's Zankel Hall, The Shed, Lincoln Center Festival, Library of Congress, Big Ears and Walt Disney Concert Hall. He has performed over 140 Steve Reich concerts with Signal including the world premiere of Reich/Richter and the US Premiere of Runner. He has also conducted Signal in Isaac Mizrahi's Peter & The Wolf at The Guggenheim Museum (NY). Between 2010 and 2012, Hagen was the assistant conductor of the Ensemble Intercontemporain in Paris. While there, he worked with Pierre Boulez, Susanna Mälkki, and Matthias Pintscher, among others. Having had a strong association with the Lucerne Festival Academy, Hagen performed one of the solo piano parts in the 2009 performance of Pierre Boulez's at the KKL Lucerne, with Pierre Boulez conducting. This will always be one of his most cherished memories. He completed his Doctor of Musical Arts degree at the Eastman School of Music, where he studied with Brad Lubman for many years.
 
Ensemble Signal, described by the New York Times as "one of the most vital groups of its kind," is a NY-based ensemble dedicated to offering the broadest possible audience access to a diverse range of contemporary works through performance, commissioning, recording, and education. Signal was founded by Co-Artistic/Executive Director Lauren Radnofsky and Co-Artistic Director/Conductor Brad Lubman. Since its debut in 2008, Signal has performed over 300 concerts, given NY, world or US premieres of over 20 works, and co-produced ten recordings. Signal has appeared at Lincoln Center Festival, Walt Disney Concert Hall, BIG EARS, Cal Performances, Carnegie Hall's Zankel Hall and The Library of Congress and has worked with artists including Reich, Lachenmann, Gordon, Lang, Wolfe, Knussen and Abrahamsen. Their recording of Reich's Music for 18 Musicians released in May 2015 on harmonia mundi received a Diapason d'or and appeared on the Billboard Classical Crossover Charts. Throughout 2017-18, they performed the US premieres of Reich's Runner at venues across the US. In the spring of 2019 Signal performed the world premiere of Reich's Reich/Richter for large ensemble, with artwork and film by Gerhard Richter and Corinna Belz for the inaugural season of New York's new multi-arts venue, The Shed.
 
Works & Process at the Guggenheim 
Described by The New York Times as "an exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process," for 35 years, New Yorkers have been able to see, hear, and meet the most acclaimed artists in the world, in an intimate setting unlike any other. Works & Process, the performing arts series at the Guggenheim, has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to generations of leading creators and performers. Most performances take place in the Guggenheim's intimate Frank Lloyd Wright-designed 273-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. In 2017, Works & Process established a new residency and commissioning program, inviting artists to create new works, made in and for the iconic Guggenheim rotunda. worksandprocess.org.

Works & Process, the Performing Arts Series at the

Guggenheim, Announces Fall 2019 Season

 

Highlights

New commissions by Machine Dazzle and Caroline ShawRotunda performances by Dance Theatre of Harlem, Roomful of Teeth, and Caleb Teicher and Ben FoldsTheatrical first looks at Joe Iconis, Theresa Rebeck, and Erica Schmidt featuring Peter DinklageDance previews featuring Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Ballet West, National Ballet of Canada, and Washington BalletBehind-the-scenes glimpses of the Metropolitan Opera's Akhnaten and Porgy and Bess 

 

"An exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process." ­­­­­­-The New York Times

 

Works & Process at the Guggenheim is pleased to announce its Fall 2019 season. Since 1984 the performing arts series has championed new works and offered audiences unprecedented access to leading creators. The intimate Frank Lloyd Wright­-designed Peter B. Lewis Theater is the venue for seventy-minute programs that explore the creative process through stimulating discussions and riveting performance highlights. One-of-a-kind productions created for the Guggenheim's rotunda offer a unique experience of the landmark space celebrating 60 years as an architectural icon.Additional information is available at worksandprocess.org.

 

Audience members are invited to cocktail hour, from 5:30 to 7:30 pm, at the The Wright restaurant and artist receptions in the rotunda following most evening programs.

 

Works & Process lead funding is provided by the the Ford Foundation,Florence Gould Foundation, the Christian Humann Foundation, Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and Evelyn Sharp Foundation, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. 

 

 

Fall 2019 Season Schedule

 

WORKS & PROCESS COMMISSION

Treasure by Machine Dazzle

Thursday-Saturday, September 5-7, 7:30 pm

Distant dreams come full circle in this Works & Process commission ofmultidisciplinary artist and maximalist Machine Dazzle. Undressing layers of his past to make sense of the present, Machine will introduce12 new looks alongside stories stitched together through song. Treasure is accompanied by music director Viva DeConcini and her band, and will premiere made-to-measure on the occasion of New York Fashion Week.

 

Treasure by Machine Dazzle is commissioned by Works & Process at the Guggenheim with support from Pomegranate Arts and a creative residency at LUMBERYARD.

 

THEATER

MCC Theater: Seared by Theresa Rebeck 

Monday, September 9, 7:30 pm

Harry, a brilliant and hot-headed chef, scores a mention in a food magazine, and his business partner sees profits finally within reach.The only problem is Harry refuses to serve his masterpiece for the masses. Mix in a shrewd restaurant consultant and a waiter with dreams of his own and it all goes to hell in this hilarious and insightful new play that asks us to consider where art ends and commerce begins. Prior to its New York premiere at the MCC Theater, playwright Theresa Rebeck and director Moritz von Stuelpnagel take audiences into the kitchen of their fit-for-foodies comedy as cast members perform highlights. 

 

DANCE* MUSIC 

The National Ballet of Canada: Orpheus Alive by Robert Binet and Missy Mazzoli

Sunday, September 15, 3 pm

Orpheus Alive retells the tragic myth of Orpheus, casting the titular characteras a woman; Eurydice, Orpheus' fallen lover, as a man; and audience members as gods of the underworld who hold Orpheus's fate in their hands. Choreographed by Robert Binet, Choreographic Associate of the National Ballet of Canada, and featuring a commissioned score by acclaimed composer Missy Mazzoli, Orpheus Alive is a story of love, loss, and an extraordinary artist facing the limits of his mortality. Company dancers and the Mivos Quartetperform excerpts, and dramaturg Rosamund Small moderates a discussion with Binet and Mazzoli about the creative process before the ballet's world premiere in Toronto.

 

OPERA

The Metropolitan Opera: The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess with Angel Blue, Camille A. Brown, Eric Owens, James Robinson, and Golda Schultz 

Monday, September 16, 7:30 pm

The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess returns to the Met for the first time since 1990in a production directed by James Robinson with choreography by Camille A. Brown in their company debuts. America's "folk opera," asdescribed in 1935 by its creators, tells the story of Porgy, sung by Eric Owens, and his love for the drug-addicted Bess, portrayed by Angel Blue, with an all-star ensemble that includes Golda Schultz. General Manager Peter Gelb moderates a discussion with the creative team while cast members presenthighlights from the upcoming production. 

 

MUSICAL

The New Group: Cyrano by Erica Schmidt, with Peter Dinklage and Aaron Dessner 

Saturday, September 28, 7:30 pm

Prior tothe New Group's world premiere of Cyrano, director Erica Schmidt, actor Peter Dinklage, and composer Aaron Dessner illuminate the creative process behind the new adaptation of the classic tale Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand. Schmidt's Cyrano is a proud man who, believing himself unlovable, agrees to woo the woman he loves on behalf of someone else. With a charged contemporary immediacy to the dialogue, Cyrano is an enduring story about heartbroken yearning, and features haunting music by Aaron Dessner and Bryce Dessner of the National, lyrics by Matt Berninger of the National and Carin Besser, and choreography by Jeff and Rick Kuperman.

 

DANCE

Ballet West: Balanchine's Ballets Russes "The Song of the Nightingale" and "Apollo" 

Sunday, September 29, 3 and 7:30 pm

With sets and costumes designed by Henri Matisse, The Song of the Nightingale (Le chant du rossignolis a tale about a mysterious songbird who cures an ailing Chinese emperor. Created by George Balanchine in 1925 when he was only 21 years old, The Song of the Nightingale was his firstpartnership with composer Igor Stravinsky, leading to a 46-year friendship that resulted in some of the greatest ballets of the twentieth century. This production marks its US premiere and designates Ballet West as the second company in the world to present this important reconstruction by Millicent Hodson and Kenneth Archer. Prior to the work's October premiere in Salt Lake City, Ballets Russes expert Lynn Garafola, Professor Emerita of Dance, Barnard College, Columbia University, moderates a discussion with Hodson, Archer, Ballet West Artistic DirectorAdam Sklute, and Balanchine Trust repetiteur Victoria Simon on Balanchine's development as a choreographer, the influence of Asian art on Matisse, and ethnic representation in the twenty-first century. The discussion will be accompanied by excerpts performed by Ballet West dancers. Simon will restage the 1928 Balanchine-Stravinsky collaboration Apollo, including the original birthing scene and final ascent to Mount Olympus. 

 

WORKS & PROCESS ROTUNDA PROJECT 

Dance Theatre of Harlem at 50

Monday, September 30, 6:30 and 8:30 pm

Founded in 1969, the Dance Theatre of Harlem made its 1971 official New York debut in the rotunda with a performance that included founder Arthur Mitchell's Tones.To celebrate the Guggenheim building's 60th and Dance Theatre of Harlem's 50th anniversaries, Works & Process will present a Rotunda Project with the Dance Theatre of Harlem. The company will pay tribute to its history in a restaging of Tones, with music by Tania León, and other works from their repertoire.

 

Floor Seating: $100/$95

Ramp Standing: $60/$55

 

Lead funding provided by the Ford Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

DANCE

The Washington Ballet: NEXTsteps 

John Heginbotham, Jessica Lang, and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa 

Sunday, October 6, 3 and 7:30 pm

Artistic director Julie Kent, a champion of new choreography, discusses upcoming world premiere works by choreographers John Heginbotham, Jessica Lang, and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa.Witness exclusive performance excerpts and a live rehearsal prior to the October 23 premiere in Washington, DC.

 

Lead sponsor Monica B. Voldstad.

 

OPERA

The Metropolitan Opera: Akhnaten by Philip Glass, with Anthony Roth Costanzo, Karen Kamensek, Phelim McDermott, and J'Nai Bridges

Wednesday, October 16, 7:30 pm

On May 6, 1984, the very first Works & Process program featured Philip Glass's Akhnaten before its debut at New York City Opera. This fall, prior to itsMetropolitan Opera premiere, General Manager Peter Gelb moderates a discussion with the creative team and countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo, who plays the title role of the revolutionary ancient Egyptian pharaoh. Highlights are performed by members of the cast. Originally presented in collaboration with Improbable by the LA Opera and English National Opera, this production received the 2017 Olivier Award for Best New Opera Production. 

 

MUSICAL

Two River Theater: Love in Hate Nation by Joe Iconis, with John Simpkins

Sunday, October 20, 7:30 pm

Writer Joe Iconis and director John Simpkins discuss the turbulent rock romance, Love in Hate Nation, set in a 1960s juvenile hall, and cast membersperform highlights prior to its world premiere at the Two River Theater with moderator Laura Heywood. Classic girl group, Wall of Sound-style vocal harmonies meet punk rock spirit in this rebellious and romantic new musical that uses classic "bad girl" movies as the inspiration for the story of young people caught between eras of a changing America. Sixteen-year old Susannah Son is carted off to the National Reformatory for Girls to get her head put on straight. There she meets the aggressively incorrigible Sheila Nail, and a relationship forms which leads to an all-out "revolution in the institution" as they attempt to break out of the boxes society has created around them. 

 

DANCE

Dance Lab New York and Joyce Theater Foundation Lab Cycle: Female Choreographers of Color in Ballet

Sunday, November 10, 7:30 pm

For one night only, see the culmination of Dance Lab New York and Joyce Theater Foundation's partnership promoting and advancing female choreographers of color in ballet. Provided with a stipend, studio time at the Joyce's Artist Residency Center, professional dancers, a studio supervisor, and administrative support, choreographers Margarita Armas, Amy Hall Garner, Micaela Taylor, and Preeti Vasudevan explored the classical, neoclassical, and contemporary ballet idioms. Lourdes Lopez, Artistic Director, Miami City Ballet, moderates the discussion with Dance Lab New York founder, Josh Prince, and the four choreographers.

 

Lead sponsor Stephen Kroll Reidy

 

DANCE * MUSIC 

Brian Brooks Moving Company: Immersive Technology

Sunday, November 17, 7:30 pm

Brian Brooks, choreographer and Mellon Creative Research Fellow at the University of Washington's Meany Center for the Performing Arts, and Michelle Witt, Executive and Artistic Director of the Meany Center, participate in a discussion moderated by Jacob's Pillow Director Pamela Tatge. Prior to the performances' premieres in 2020, see highlights from Brooks's fellowship, where he explored dance in intimate physical and digital spaces and collaborated with Seattle-based physicists and virtual reality programmers. 

 

DANCE

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: New Work

Monday, November 18, 7:30 pm

Preview a world premiere from Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's December season at New York City Center. Artistic Director Robert Battle and the choreographer participate in a moderated discussion and Ailey's acclaimed dancers perform highlights.

 

DANCE

Merce Cunningham Centennial Celebration 

Sunday and Monday, November 24 and 25, 7:30 pm

Dylan Crossman, a former member of Merce Cunningham Dance Company, curates a program celebrating the 100th birthday of modern dance legend Merce Cunningham. Fellow former company dancers, including Jamie Scott, perform duets examining Cunningham's evolution over decades. A unique MinEvent (an uninterrupted sequence of excerpts of works by Cunningham) made for the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed theater at the Guggenheim including movements from Night of 100 Solos will be performed by dancers from A.I.M, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Limón Dance Company, New York City Ballet, and more. Costumes by Reid Bartelme and Harriet Jung and music by John King complement the program. Andrea Weber moderates a discussion with former Cunningham dancers Kimberly Bartosik and Gus Solomons.

 

This program is presented courtesy of the Merce Cunningham Trust as part of the Cunningham Centennial celebrations. Choreography by Merce Cunningham © Merce Cunningham Trust. All rights reserved.

 

DANCE * MUSIC 

Peter & the Wolf with Isaac Mizrahi 

Saturday, December 7, 1, 2:30, and 4 pm

Sunday, December 8, 1:30* and 4 pm 

Friday, December 13, 6:30 pm

Saturday, December 14, 1, 2:30 and 4 pm

Sunday, December 15, 2:30 and 4 pm

Isaac Mizrahi narrates and directs Sergei Prokofiev's charming children's classic. Ensemble Signal performs the music, and the cast, wearing costumes by Mizrahi, performs choreography by John Heginbotham, bringing the 30-minute story to life for the young and young at heart. 

 

Premium front row seating for all performances $100/$95 members

General tickets $45/$40 members

 

*In partnership with the Guggenheim's education department and Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing, for the December 8, 1:30 pm program, two-time CaldecottMedal winning illustrator Chris Raschka, will read from his illustrated telling of Peter & The Wolf at 1:30 pm, followed by the performance starting at 2:30pm. Tickets for this special event are $100/$95 member and include a signed copy of Chris Raschka's Peter & the Wolf.

 

No matter how tall or small, everyone needs a ticket. Please enter via the ramp at the corner of 5th Ave & 88th St.

 

WORKS & PROCESS ROTUNDA PARTY
Swing Dancing with Caleb Teicher, Ben Folds, and Eyal Vilner Big Band

Monday, December 9, 6:30-11 pm
Choreographer and dancer Caleb Teicher, musician Ben Folds, and friends come together for a special performance set in the Guggenheim rotunda. Accompanied by Eyal Vilner Big Band, Teicher will teach an introduction to swing dancing, followed by a party to put the moves in motion.

 

Lead sponsor First Republic Bank

 

6:30-11 pm:

VIP Cocktail Reception, Performance, and Dancing

VIP table for six: $5,000

Table for six: $3,000

VIP seated ticket: $500

Rotunda floor general seated ticket: $250

 

7:30-11 pm:    

Performance, Drinks and Dancing

Ramp standing ticket: $75

 

 

MUSIC

Rotunda Holiday Concert with Roomful of Teeth and Caroline Shaw

Sunday and Monday, December 15 and 16, 7 pm

Celebrate the season with the joyous sounds of holiday music and a new Works & Process commission of composer Caroline Shaw. Roomful of Teeth perform as part of this beloved annual tradition in the museum's iconic Frank Lloyd Wright-designed rotunda.

 

Floor seating: $60, $55 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members

Ramp standing: $25, $20 Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members

 

 

Location:         

Peter B. Lewis Theater

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

1071 Fifth Avenue at 89th Street

Subway: 4, 5, 6, or Q train to 86th Street

Bus: M1, M2, M3, or M4 bus on Madison or Fifth Avenue

 

Tickets:            

$45, $40 members (unless otherwise noted)

$10 student rush tickets one hour before performance, based on availability

(for students under 30 with valid ID) 

Priority ticket access and preferred seat selection starts July 22 for $500+ Friends of Works & Process and Guggenheim members at the Associate level and above.

 

General ticketing starts July 29.

 

For more information, call 212 758 0024 or 212 423 3587, Mon-Fri, 1-5 pm, or visit worksandprocess.org.

 

guggenheim.org/social

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